Camping at Lake Tobesofkee, GA 2 comments


Weekend Camping Adventure {living outside the stacks}

The Hubs and I are really digging the camp life. I’m gonna be honest, I didn’t think I’d like it: sleeping out in the middle of nowhere, talking to *shudder* strangers, peeing in the woods, eating scavenged food… OK. I exaggerate. But consider my point of reference: when I was in the Army, “camping” involved ruck sacks, miles long marches in combat boots, and lots of chiggers.

 Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

 Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

What The Hubs and I do is far from bivouacking but not lux enough to be called “glamping.” It’s just, I don’t know, fun.

 Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

There’s a range off the side of the camper. It’s the most beautiful thing ever.

 Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

Actually, I’m wrong. That is the most beautiful thing ever: The Hubs making breakfast.

 Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

He made sausage patties and scrambled eggs. Yum. I contributed the avocado.

 Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

 Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

This past weekend, we packed Squeekerz up and went to Lake Tobesofkee in Macon, Georgia. It was beautiful. While we were there, we decided to take the opportunity to visit some of the local sites like the Tubman Museum and the Hay House.

 Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

 Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

We didn’t stay at the Tubman Museum very long because they were having a Celebrate Dads event and it was paaaaacked. That being said, the few pieces of the exhibit that I did see were beyond soul stirring. There were images of prisoners in labor camps, repurposed found objects, and examples of inventions/improvements by African American inventors. Of course, I couldn’t help but to stand mesmerized at the images of Ms. Harriet Tubman. I didn’t take any photos of the Harriet Tubman exhibits out of respect for the creators of the pieces. A few weeks ago, I watched the “Minty” episode of Underground starring Ms. Aisha Hinds and, oh my word, she just brought everything to life. So standing in that room, seeing the almost life size sculpture of Ms. Tubman was overwhelming.

The Hay House is beyond incredible. I can’t imagine living in a place that is so over-the-top elaborate.

Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

This home had gas running throughout when gas and indoor plumbing was just being introduced to society.

Lake Tobesofkee {living outside the stacks} #TeamLOTSTravels

The oak doors are hand painted to look like a much more expensive wood. Why? Because they could afford it.

If you’d like to see more of our pictures from our travels, follow me on Instagram and look for the hashtag #TeamLOTSTravels.

Looking forward to many more relaxing weekends,

Daenel T {Living Outside the Stacks}

 

 

 

 

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  • You’ve got a good man there. My PC is wonderful in many ways but cooking is not one of them.

    Would like to see the different images of Harriet Tubman. The children’s biographies I have used for research with my students all feature the same two photographs. Somehow I was under the impression that there were only two photos taken during her life. She is one of my favorite heroes to teach. I am sure touring the museum is a heart wrenching experience

    • Leslie, he’s definitely a good guy. I think he’s enjoying the camping so much that he’s forgotten how much he hates cooking and doing all of that domestic stuff. LOL

      The museum had two images of Harriet Tubman: the one that we always see of her in the chair and one of her with her family. The rest of the exhibit dealt with the life of black folks in Georgia: products that were invented by black folks, documentary images of folks in prisons, etc. It was very interesting and heartbreaking. But also empowering.